P.S./I.S. 192- The Magnet School for Math and Science Inquiry

4715 18th Avenue

Brooklyn, New York 11204

Telephone Number: 1-718-633-3061    Fax Number: 1-718-871-8721

 

Liset Isaac, Principal

Janine Kraljev and Catherine Campanella 

Assistant Principals

 

Yolanda Fioriello, Parent Coordinator

Parent Meeting

Please join us for a  Parent Meeting on Friday, August 7, 2020 at 1:00 PM via Google Meets

using Nickname: 192 Family

Please use your child's psis192.org email address/account to join. 

We will be discussing important updates and plans for the re-opening of the 2020-2021 school year. 

Hope to see you then!

 

Learning Preference Surveys

This year, all New York City schools will be offering different learning options for students in the coming school year. Please fill out your learning preference survey as soon as possible by clicking here or calling 311.

Messages to Families

August 6, 2020: Update for Families on Instruction

Dear Families,

The educators and staff at your child’s school, and all of us at the DOE, continue to work around the clock to prepare for a safe and healthy return to school in September. An important part of our planning depends on you! Today I am writing with additional information and an important reminder as we head into September.

All schools are currently preparing for a blended learning model. Blended learning means that students learn part of the time in-person in school buildings, and continue their learning remotely, from home, on the remaining weekdays. Any family can also choose all-remote learning this fall, for any reason. If all-remote learning is your preference, we ask to hear from you by filling out a short web form (link below), or by calling 311, by this Friday, August 7. If you begin in blended learning, you can decide later to transition to all-remote, but to best support schools in their planning for reopening, we ask that those who have a preference for 100% remote notify us by this Friday, August 7.

Fill out a short form now if you would like to continue all-remote learning this fall:

As you consider which learning model is best for your child, I want to restate our guiding principles that apply to every student’s education: All students will be learning five days a week, and teachers will continue to deliver high-quality instruction that is culturally responsive, rigorous and developmentally appropriate for all students, in all learning settings.

We are sharing additional information below about both blended and all-remote instruction to empower you to make this choice. This builds on the information contained in the letter sent to families in late July comparing remote and blended learning, which you can find below. 

Types of Teaching and Learning

Whether your child is participating in blended learning or learning 100 percent remotely, they will receive instruction by 1) interacting live with their teachers and 2) by independently completing assignments and projects throughout the school day and week.

Teachers

Students engaged in remote learning will, for the most part, be taught by teachers from their school community. While there may be limited exceptions on a school-by-school basis, parents can expect their children to be assigned teachers from their school community when they receive their children’s full schedules before the school year begins.

Live Interaction 

Teachers will provide daily live instruction for our fully remote learners, as well as for those students participating in the blended learning model. Teachers will deliver live instruction in short intervals (15–20 consecutive minutes) throughout the school day for our youngest learners and may increase in length based on the student’s developmental stage and grade level. We will share additional information on live instruction in the coming weeks.

Posting Schedules

Schools will post class schedules and schedules for live instruction for all students—those fully remote as well as those participating in blended learning—online. You will have access to these schedules in advance so you can plan your work and family commitments. Schools will also ensure students have sufficient time for high-quality interactions with their teachers and classmates.

Direct Support

Teachers will have dedicated time every school day to engage with students and families via video conference or telephone. We encourage you to take advantage of this time to get guidance and updates related to your child’s progress and learning.

Lunch in the Classroom

In-person student lunch will be instructional time in most instances, modeled on our Breakfast in the Classroom program. In elementary schools, for example, during lunch, students will take part in learning activities that are fun, engaging, and enriching, such as interactive read-alouds, social-emotional learning, and content through music. In middle and high schools, during lunch, students will engage with a specific content area. Schools will maintain all health and safety guidelines for in-person learning and for consuming food and drink during this time.

Community Building

All students will have routines that build community, center the day, and set them up for success. This will provide all students with community- and relationship-building experiences that are an integral part of a typical school community. For example, this may consist of a daily morning meeting where the teacher engages students in activities related to social-emotional wellness and community-building, or a daily closing activity where the teacher recaps the learning for the day, and gets students prepared for the following day. Schools and teachers will share more about this as we approach the first day of school. 

Social-Emotional Support

We know that current circumstances in the pandemic have been very difficult for you and your children. Students have been isolated from their teachers, classmates, and school communities. For this reason, we will allow time for teachers, school-based staff, and students to readjust to being in school buildings and to adapt to changes. In addition, we will integrate social-emotional activities and trauma-informed care into academic subjects to the greatest extent possible throughout the day. We will also prioritize mental health supports throughout the school year.

Grading

All students must meet the same academic requirements, whether they are engaged in fully remote or blended learning. The teacher overseeing your child’s classwork is responsible for designing or selecting assessments to measure student progress. These may include projects, exams administered within or outside the online platform, portfolios, and other measures of student mastery.

There is no doubt that we have all learned a lot since March—both about the virus, and about our ability to keep learning going during this unprecedented time. That is why we won’t settle for anything but the most rigorous and engaging instructional experience for your child, in whatever learning model you choose. Your needs—along with those of your children and the staff who serve them—continue to be at the center of our back-to-school planning.

We will send more information in the coming days and weeks. As always, we encourage you to check schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020(Open external link) for the latest information on what the next year will bring.

Thank you for being part of the DOE family. 

Welcome to PS/IS 192!

Our Mission Statement 

 PS/IS 192 , the Magnet School of Math and Science Inquiry, is the school of character and intelligence. At PS/IS 192 each student is special and precious. Our school mission is to use every minute for every child to excel as a student and as a citizen.

Regular School Hours

School opens at 7:30 AM for breakfast.  If you eat breakfast at home, remember that the school day begins at 8:00 AM.  Be on time.  Punctuality is important.

 

                                                                 

 

July 27, 2020 Update from the Chancellor

July 27, 2020: Update for Families on School Reopening from Chancellor Carranza

Dear Families, 

I hope you and your children are well and enjoying some time off this summer. September will be here before we know it, and I am writing to you today to keep you updated on the 2020–21 school year and make sure you know how to be part of the conversation. Throughout this summer, as we diligently work to clarify operations for the fall, I promise to be transparent about what we know—and what we don’t yet know.

Your Learning Options 

First things first: New York City students will be learning five days a week, whether in person or at home. As previously announced, schools are planning for blended learning, in which students will be taught in school buildings for part of the week, and will continue learning remotely from home on the other days of the week. Any family can also choose all-remote learning, for any reason. We know that the majority of families want as much in-person instruction as is safely possible, and we will work to maximize it at every turn, consistent with health and safety requirements. However, if you intend to choose all-remote learning for your child and have not yet notified us, please let us know by August 7 so schools can plan accordingly. You can fill out a web form(Open external link) or call 311. 

To enable you to make a more informed choice, we have prepared some important comparisons about what you can expect from each mode of learning, below. Families who choose all-remote instruction will be able to opt back in to blended learning on a quarterly basis throughout the school year, beginning in November. 

No matter whether you are at school in-person or you are learning remotely, you and your child are still enrolled in and part of your school community. Your child’s schedule and learning experience will be fully managed by your school. The vast majority of students who participate in fully remote learning will be taught by teachers from their school. While there may be some limited exceptions on a school-by-school basis, you should expect your child to be assigned teachers from their school when they receive their full schedule before the school year begins. 

As our plans continue to come together, we must be nimble. We will make adjustments as public health conditions continue to evolve.

How to Learn More

Every week, we will be posting more information about school operations to our Return to School 2020 page. Please bookmark this page and visit it frequently. On this page, you will find information on Physical Education, Arts Education, and more. We are asking for your patience and flexibility throughout this process as we work through a great deal of planning in collaboration with our teachers, principals, and school-based staff. 

Your voice and feedback are essential as our work continues. We are creating many opportunities for you to discuss the year ahead with the DOE, and we hope you will get involved. We hosted our first citywide information session on July 16, and received many great suggestions from families across the City. Please join us for one of the upcoming info sessions Tuesday, July 28; Wednesday, August 12; and Thursday, August 27. You can visit our Return to School 2020 page to register and submit a question.

In addition, each school will host a parent meeting to discuss the proposed school schedule and to review planning for the year ahead, and we will be holding community and advocate round-table meetings, briefings with Community Education Council leaders and elected officials, and more.

While the world around us continues to change, our commitment to the health and safety of our students, teachers, staff, and families remains steadfast, and so does our focus on equity and excellence. We will deliver what your child needs to succeed academically, knowing the traumatic impact this crisis has had on New Yorkers of all ages. We will ensure your child feels welcome and supported in their school community, no matter what.

Thank you for continuing to share your comments and questions. I have said it before, but it’s no less true now: You are our most important partners and I am grateful for you today and every day. Please stay safe and healthy.

 

Comparison of Remote and Blended Learning Experiences: School Year 2020-21

Fully Remote Learning Experience Blended Learning Experience
Fully remote instruction at home. Combination of learning in-person at school buildings, and remote instruction at home.

Students participate in a regular schedule of age-appropriate, standards-based remote learning from home every day.
 

Students go to school buildings for age-appropriate, standards-based, in-person instruction on some days; and continue their learning from home remotely on the other days of the week.

Students will have live interaction with teachers every day.

On in-person days, students will attend classes in their school building. 

We are also working to ensure live interaction for students in blended learning on each day they are learning remotely.

Every class will include live instruction. The amount will vary by grade, depending on what is developmentally appropriate. On in-person days, students will have the opportunity for whole class, small group, and individual work and collaboration with classmates and teachers.

Students will use a DOE-approved online platform (such as iLearnNYC or Google Classroom), available in multiple languages, for lessons and submission of work.

Students will experience whole class, small group and/or individualized instruction in an online environment, as well as collaboration with classmates and teachers.

Students will use a DOE-approved online platform (such as iLearnNYC or Google Classroom), available in multiple languages, for lessons and submission of work.
 
We will make every effort to ensure students consistently have the same instructors throughout the year.
 
We will make every effort to ensure students will be taught by a consistent set of teachers in-person and remotely, who work together throughout the year to maintain continuity and maximize learning.
There will be an emphasis on social-emotional learning across school communities to ensure the mental health and wellness of students and staff. There will be an emphasis on social-emotional learning across school communities to ensure the mental health and wellness of students and staff.
Students will be able to access video-recorded lessons, assignments, and tasks.
 
Students will be able to access video-recorded lessons, assignments, and tasks.
 
Teachers will regularly engage students and families to check student work, provide timely feedback, and adjust instruction as necessary, via remote learning platforms, calls, emails, video chats, etc. 
 
Teachers will regularly engage students and families to check student work, provide timely feedback, and adjust instruction as necessary, in-person and via remote learning platforms, calls, emails, video chats, etc.
Students and families will have access to one-on-one support to help with instructional activities. Students and families will have access to one-on-one support to help with instructional activities.July

August 3, 2020 - Letter to Families from the Chancellor

Dear Families,

Criteria to Open Schools and Keep them Open

August 3, 2020

I hope you are safe and healthy, and finding some rest and relaxation this summer. As we are approaching the start of the 2020-21 school year, I want to share some important new information with you about health and safety protocols in your child’s school—and every school—for the upcoming year.

All schools are preparing for blended learning, during which students learn in-person in school buildings for part of the week, and continue learning remotely from home on the other days. However, any family can choose 100%

remote learning for any reason. If your preference is 100% remote learning, we ask that you let us know by this Friday, August 7, so that schools have enough time to plan. Please visit schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020 to fill out a short web form, or call 311.

In this letter you will find:

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  •   Criteria to Open Schools and Keep them Open

  •   What Happens if Someone Gets Sick: New Information on COVID-19 Testing and Tracing in

    Schools

  •   Overall Health and Safety Protocols for Every School

While we continue to carefully monitor a constantly changing health landscape, one thing remains steadfast: our commitment to the health and safety of our students, teachers, and staff. This priority is the foundation of all of our policy moving into September.

On July 31, the Mayor and I announced that for school buildings to open in September and remain open, on a weekly average the city must see fewer than 3% of all COVID-19 tests come back positive. Additionally, if 3% or more of New Yorkers who are tested for COVID-19 are found to have the virus after we open, school buildings will close again, and 100% of learning will be remote for every student.

Since June, we’ve hovered around 1-2%, and are working closely with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC Health), NYC Test + Trace, and the Mayor’s Office to prepare for a coordinated school reopening. If staff and students aren’t healthy, they can’t teach and learn, and we are doing all we can to

ensure that schools remain safe and healthy for learning.

What Happens if Someone Gets Sick: New Information on COVID-19 Testing and Tracing in Schools

In close collaboration with our expert colleagues at NYC Health, we have developed strict protocols that address prevention, precaution, and response to one or more of our students or employees having a confirmed case of COVID-19. It’s important to know that a “confirmed case” means that a parent or guardian, student, or staff member submits a positive test result from a healthcare provider or laboratory—like a City-run testing site, a private doctor, or an urgent care center—to the school.

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Our protocols to keep school communities healthy include:

 Prevention: Starting with the first day of the 2020-21 school year, if a student or staff member is feeling sick, they are required to stay home. Additionally, if their symptoms are consistent with COVID-19, they will be asked to get tested.

 Feeling Sick in School: If a student begins experiencing symptoms in school, they will be isolated and monitored by a school staff member until they are picked up by their parent or guardian. Staff members who become symptomatic at school must notify administration and immediately leave the building.

 Testing: All school staff members are asked to get tested for COVID-19 in the days leading up to the beginning of school, and will be prioritized for expedited results at the 34 City-run testing sites. All school staff are also asked to get tested monthly during the school year. This free testing is also available for families citywide.

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 Tracing: In the event of a confirmed COVID-19 case in a school, NYC Test + Trace and NYC Health will investigate to determine close contacts within the school. All students and teachers in the classroom with the confirmed case are assumed close contacts and will be instructed to self-quarantine for 14 days since their last exposure to that case. In older grades where students may travel between classes, this applies to all classes that the confirmed case was in.

If there's more than one case in a school, and it's not in the same classroom, learning will continue remotely and the school building will close for at least 24 hours while NYC Test + Trace and NYC Health investigate. Depending on the outcome of the investigation, affected classrooms or the whole building will remain closed for 14 days for quarantine.

Students will continue their learning remotely during any necessary quarantine periods.

 Communication: Whether symptoms begin at home or in school, there will be a clear flow of information to facilitate fast action and prevent spread. If a COVID-19 case is confirmed, schools will communicate to all families and students at school.

Overall Health and Safety Protocols for Every School

Testing and tracing are part of several strict health protocols designed to keep our school communities healthy. Here are the key things that you and your family should know about NYC Department of Education (DOE) health and safety practices, policies, and protocols as we re-open our school buildings in September:

  •   At all times, students and staff must wear face coverings protecting their nose and mouth while at school or on their way to school. Exceptions will be made for children who can’t wear a face covering for medical reasons, and for younger children who aren’t developmentally able to wear a face covering.

  •   Students and staff must maintain six feet of physical distancing throughout the school day, anywhere on school grounds and to and from school.

  •   Schools will be cleaned throughout the day and disinfected each night, with special attention to high-touch areas.

  •   Face coverings, hand sanitizer, and cleaning supplies will be readily available in throughout every school.

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  •   Every school will have a school-based team ready to respond in the event that there is a health concern in a school.

  •   Every school will have a designated isolation room for use in the event that a student becomes ill during the school day.

    For more details on these and other policies, please visit schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020 and click “Health and Safety” for additional information and all the latest updates.

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We are approaching reopening by centering health and safety and basing our policies on the expertise of health professionals—period.

I’ve been a public school parent, teacher, and principal, and I know what it feels like to want the best possible education for your child while ensuring the health and safety of your entire family. We have collectively learned a lot since March—both about the virus, and about our ability to react and respond to it in real time. That’s why we won’t settle for anything but the strictest and most rigorous processes for coming back to school.

We will send more information in the coming days and weeks. As always—thank you for being part of the DOE family.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza
Chancellor
New York City Department of Education

A

School Reopening

July 8, 2020

Dear Families,

I hope you are having a restful summer so far, and staying healthy and safe. I am writing today to share important information about the fall, when school will start up again for the 2020-2021 school year. At the conclusion of this note you will find this information organized by topic, including school scheduling, health and safety protocols, and more. Please bookmark schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020, where more information is available, and which will be regularly updated as we get closer to reopening. 

Our commitment to health and safety drives everything that we do. It drove the transition to remote learning this past March, when we knew that closing school buildings was essential to flattening the curve of COVID-19 infection across New York City. It was profoundly challenging, but you and your children handled it with unbelievable grace and effort, and school communities came together to make it work in historic fashion. 

Now, almost four months later, our commitment to health and safety will drive us into the new school year. We have been through so much together, and as we look ahead to September, we see the big picture: the continuing rise in cases across the country; current guidance from City, State, and Federal health authorities; and the knowledge that as the trajectory of the virus continues to evolve, the guidance we must follow will also evolve. When it does, we have to be ready, and prepared to adapt. We’ve also received over 400,000 responses from families and students to a survey asking about preferences and concerns for the upcoming year, and your input has been critical in our planning.

Taken together, this picture demands we begin the 2020-21 school year in an unprecedented way—including new health protocols, physical distancing, and more. Make no mistake: New York City students will still be learning 5 days a week. A major difference is that we are preparing to deliver their education through a blended learning model. Blended learning means students will be taught on-site in school for part of the week, and will attend school remotely on the other days of the week.

Any family can also choose all-remote learning, for any reason. But we know that the majority of families want as much in-person instruction as is safely possible, and we will work to maximize it at every turn, consistent with health and safety requirements. We will continue to lead with the lens of equity and excellence, giving your child what they need to excel—and recognizing the ways that will be different from each of their classmates, especially in a time of crisis. We will not look away from the ways this virus has further magnified the effects of systemic racism in our communities. We will continue to explore opportunities to directly correct structural inequities— like closing the digital divide.

Our plans must be nimble so we can adjust and update as needed, as the public health landscape continues to evolve. We are also awaiting guidance from the State of New York, and we will be closely coordinating with them once it is released. All of the most up-to-date information will be available at schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020, and at the end of this letter are the most important takeaways for you at this moment. Please remember that this guidance may change as public health conditions evolve.  In closing, I want to say that I’m excited, and I’m anxious—just like you. I know that blending in-person and remote learning feels like an improvement over the all-remote experience of the last three months, but still comes with many questions and concerns. We will work with you every step of the way to answer questions around sibling scheduling, transportation, what happens if there’s a confirmed case in a school, and more. I’m committed to doing everything I can to make this easy for you—and I will not compromise on health and safety.

I always say that New York City has the best students, families, and staff in the world—and that nothing will ever change that. A safe return to schools in the fall, and the broader safety of our whole city, will require we consistently work together as partners—DOE staff, families, and students. Together we can ensure that the 1.1 million students—your children—in the NYC public school system get the education they deserve in the safest, most supportive environments possible.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

Return to school Critical Information

Return to School 2020:

Critical Information

Overall Guidance

 The 2020-21 school year will start in September 2020. We will announce details about the first day of school in the coming weeks.  NYC students will be learning 5 days a week, whether in-person in school buildings or remotely at home.    We are maximizing in-person instruction as much as possible given health and safety guidance, which includes social distancing. Students will return in either a blended learning model (a combination of remote learning from home, and in-person instruction in school buildings), or a fully remote learning model from home, if you so choose.    Health officials have made clear that following basic safety protocols are key to reducing the spread of COVID-19: social distancing, face coverings (masks), handwashing, and staying home when sick. 

Developing Your Child’s Schedule

As of now, given current health and safety guidance, we will not be able to have 100% of students present in a school building on any given day. You should expect to hear from your school in August regarding your child’s specific schedule.

Under the blended learning model, students will be taught on-site in school buildings for part of the week, and will learn remotely from home on the other days of the week.

 Schools will choose a schedule from a limited number of models that take into account the space constraints of their school buildings, and that prioritize consistency for parents and students in their scheduling.

   You can expect your child or children to be in school one to two consistent days per week, with additional in-person days on a rotating schedule based on groups or cohorts of students.

 Schools will make every effort to safely conduct as much instruction in-person as possible, and your principal will communicate your child’s schedule with you in August. 

We know that there are families who may not feel comfortable going back into school buildings in the fall. You can elect to choose all-remote learning for your child; a web form will be shared with you on July 15 that will allow you to select that preference by August 7. Families who have chosen fully remote learning at the beginning of the school year will be allowed to transition back into in-person instruction on a quarterly basis. Once the school year begins, families can choose to go fully remote at any time. 

New Health and Safety Protocols

 All people (including students and adults) in a school building should remain at least 6 feet apart at all times, including in classrooms, common areas, and during lunch periods.

   Face coverings will be required for all students, staff, and visitors while inside buildings. Disposable face coverings will be provided to students and staff who need them.  o Exceptions will be made for those who cannot wear masks for developmental reasons, including based on their age.  Students and staff will have increased access to handwashing and sanitizer. Schools will be supplied with additional cleaning supplies, including hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes.

   All schools will identify a space to be equipped as an Isolation Room in the event a student or staff member becomes ill while at school. 

 Our buildings will be deep-cleaned on a nightly basis with electrostatic disinfectant sprayers, and HVAC systems are being upgraded to ensure better ventilation. 

Equity and Excellence: Our Continued Commitment

Our vision of educational equity and excellence for all students persists even during this time of crisis. We are laser focused on helping your child achieve academic excellence by providing key academic, social-emotional, and other supports to unlock their full potential to learn—no matter who they are. We remain focused on high quality, tailored instruction for every student. In addition, here is some of what we will do to help our children reach their highest potential:

 We will allow time for students to readjust to being in school buildings, and to adapt to changes.

 We will integrate social-emotional learning and trauma-informed care into core academic instruction, and all New York City public schools will prioritize access to mental health supports throughout the 2020-2021 school year.

 For students with IEPs, this fall we will continue to offer in-person services to all who opt to receive inperson services to the greatest extent possible. 

 Multilingual learners will receive an instructional program that will ensure continued progress in both their language development and content area knowledge.  

Keeping You Informed

As we finalize plans for a school year like no other in our history, we know how important it is that our students, families, and staff have the information they need to prepare. We know that for each piece of information we are providing, more questions can emerge. Please visit the Return to School 2020 webpage at schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020 on a regular basis for the latest updates.

Throughout the summer we will continue to engage with families, students, and community leaders—both centrally through the DOE and within each school community. 

   Centrally, the DOE will host a series of online Family & Student Information Sessions to answer any questions or concerns that families may have. The first of these will be held on July 16. More details and a full calendar will be available at schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020.   

 We will be convening community and advocate roundtable meetings, briefings with elected officials and Community Education Council leaders, and more.  

   Specific guidance will be coming soon for families with children enrolled in CBO-based early childhood programs.  schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020

 

June 26, 2020

Dear Families,

As this unprecedented school year comes to a close, I want to thank you and your children for your patience, resilience, and perseverance in adapting to the closing of school buildings and remote learning. No one ever imagined confronting such a disruptive and damaging pandemic. I recognize it imposed hardships on you, and brought new complications in the education of our students—especially those who are building their proficiency in English.

I started off in kindergarten not speaking a word of English, so I personally know the kinds of challenges that you and your children face even under normal circumstances. That is why all of us at the DOE embrace your home language, home culture, and traditions—all of the things that make you and your child who you are. We are dedicated to making your child’s educational experience safe, welcoming, and supportive. That’s true in our school buildings and when we are teaching your children remotely.

Over the summer and heading into the fall, we remain committed to equipping our educators with the knowledge and tools they need to ensure your child has the language support required to learn grade-level material. I encourage you to connect with your teacher if you have not already to identify what programs, resources, and strategies you can use over the summer to build your child’s language development. Supporting your child’s summer learning process is a high priority for all of us.

At the same time, please work with your child in your home language as well! Reading, writing, and asking questions in the language you use will lead to their academic success in both languages.

We are looking toward the fall and making key decisions regarding re-opening school buildings in the safest way possible. If you have not already done so, please help us guide that process by completing our Return to School survey at schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020 by June 30.

I am grateful for your partnership in educating your child and hope you enjoy your summer!

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

June 26, 2020

Dear Families,

As this unprecedented school year comes to a close, I want to thank you and your children for your patience, resilience, and perseverance in adapting to the closing of school buildings and the implementation of remote learning. I recognize that the situation imposed hardships on you and brought new complications in the education of our students—especially those with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). We are extremely grateful for everything you have done to partner with us in supporting your child and helping us adapt to these challenging times.

As we have engaged in virtual instructional and teletherapy programs, you have risen to the occasion and been your child’s greatest source of support. In continuing to explore options to best address your child’s needs, we will rely heavily on the strong bonds we have forged with you along our collaborative journey to help us make decisions that truly make a difference.

Your child’s teacher should have contacted you for an end-of-year wrap-up conversation to support the transition to summer. Should you seek additional information, please reach out to your child’s principal directly. We encourage you to ask questions about progress made on your child’s IEP goals, to make recommendations and offer feedback about what has and hasn’t worked for your child during the remote learning period, and to request information to support the transition to summer. We also encourage you to talk to your child’s teacher and school administrators about any recommendations regarding summer school for additional academic support.

During these past three months, we have broadened our vision of what family engagement and empowerment can truly mean. We have heard the voices of parents and families like you during various workshops and forums, offering questions, concerns, and recommendations about your child’s learning process. We have heard from many of you that the Beyond Access series of online learning workshops for families of children with disabilities, as well as family office hours, provided valuable information that can be put to immediate use. We will continue to provide resources, workshops, and family sessions in order to support you as we prepare for September and beyond.

As we look toward the fall and make key decisions regarding re-opening school buildings in the safest way possible, we will continue to rely on you to offer input about what would work best for you and your child. If you have not already done so, please help us guide that process by completing our Return to School survey at schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020 by June 30.

We at the DOE are deeply committed to serving all of our students with IEPs and providing them with an excellent education.

I am grateful for your partnership in educating your child and hope you enjoy your summer!

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

June 15, 2020

Dear Families,

I hope you had a safe and restful weekend. I’d like to share information provided by our City colleagues about two important actions you can take immediately to have your voice heard about the future of our city: filling out the 2020 United States Census, and voting in the primary election on Tuesday, June 23. Here is what you need to know:

How to Vote in the June 23 Primary Election

This month, primary elections will take place across New York City. You can confirm which races are happening in your district with nyc.pollsitelocator.com

Here’s how you can vote:

Vote by Mail

 In order to prevent the spread of COVID-19, all New Yorkers with primary elections are able to vote by mail. You must request your mail-in ballot by Tuesday, June 16, which can be done online at nycabsentee.com, by calling 1-866-VOTE-NYC, or by mail.

 For those who are away from home, you may request that your ballot be sent to your current residence. Once you receive your ballot, you must complete and postmark it by Tuesday, June 23. For more information, visit vote.nyc

Vote in Person

 In-person voting, including early voting, is still available. You may do so during the early voting period from now until Sunday, June 21, or on Election Day, June 23.

 If possible, we recommend voting early, when crowds are expected to be smaller and lines to be shorter. To find your early voting site, Election Day site, and poll site hours, visit nyc.pollsitelocator.com

 To register to vote in future elections, update your existing registration, find your assigned poll site, check your registration status, or get more information on voting, visit voting.nyc or call 311.

How to Fill Out the United States Census

The Census is a headcount of the U.S. population that happens once every ten years. It is extremely important to fill out because it determines critical educational resources available to New York City, as well as other vital government benefits and electoral representation.

This year, filling out the Census is easier than ever. You can complete it in five minutes, in fifteen languages, online at my2020census.gov or over the phone by calling 844-330-2020.

The Census does not include a citizenship question. Even if you are undocumented, filling out the census will not put you or your family at risk. Census responses are private, protected by federal law, and will never be shared with NYCHA, ICE, HRA, Department of Buildings, or any other government agency—or your landlord.

You and your family need to be counted because Census results determine critical school funding, including special education grants, extra supplies, much-needed technology, and more teachers for our classrooms. It also helps to set funding for Early Learn Centers, In-School and Out-of-School Youth Programs, child care programs, and more.

The Census also serves enormously important non-education purposes. That includes funding for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, hospital care, affordable housing, and more. Plus, the Census affects each state’s allotment of representatives to Congress and Electoral College votes.

Now more than ever, we need to step up and help make sure all New Yorkers are counted! A complete count will bring our city the resources we need as we recover from the pandemic and its economic impact.

Civic participation is critical for a healthy democracy. I hope these resources are of use to you and your family.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

Updated Letter from Chancellor Carranza -June 12, 2020

June 12, 2020

Dear Families,

I hope you are staying safe and healthy. We are heading towards the end of the school year, soon to close the chapter on an experience none of us could have imagined.

But while we are thinking about concluding one chapter, we are focused on the beginning of another: what the future of our schools will look like, and how we will come back in September for the 2020-21 school year. I am writing today with an important update and an opportunity to lend your voice to the planning for this fall.

You, your children, and all the staff at DOE have done an extraordinary job adjusting to a total transformation ofeducation in the nation’s largest public school system. We must continue to center health and safety and be prepared to follow guidance issued by health experts and other important authorities as autumn approaches. Since we don’t know what the state of the coronavirus will be at that time, we must be ready for a number of options for teaching and learning. In addition to the risks posed by COVID-19 directly, we are acutely aware of the emergence of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), a condition related to COVID-19 that has affected children in New York City as well as across the country and the world.

What Might Fall 2020 Look Like?

We have not yet made any firm decisions for what this fall will look like as we start the 2020-2021 school year. However, we believe that all options will need to take into account social distancing. We know that for many students, nothing can quite match full-time teaching and learning in a school building. Given the ongoing health risks related to COVID-19, we also need to prepare for a variety of educational models and approaches, including what I call blended learning. Blended learning means combining in-person and remote instruction to create a powerful educational experience where each mode of learning supports the other. Throughout it all, the goal remains to provide as much in-person learning as possible, and give every child the academic support they need while keeping them safe.

Lend Your Voice Through the Return to School 2020 Survey

There are many ways blended learning can operate, and we know every student and family has experienced remote learning differently. We want to hear from you about your preferences and concerns as we head into the 2020- 2021 school year. We have created a short survey for both families and students—please take a moment to fill it out and share your thoughts by Monday, June 22. The survey is anonymous and should take about 7 minutes to complete. It’s available in 9 languages at schools.nyc.gov/returntoschool2020, and those without the ability to complete it online can do so by calling 311. Thank you in advance for taking the time to again give us your feedback: it will help us to better serve you.

Working together, we will build a strong, just, safe, and successful future for our schools and our City. Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza
Chancellor
New York City Department of Education

GRADUATION 2020

 

June 2020

To the Families of the Class of 2020,

First, we would like to congratulate your children on reaching this special milestone! We know they have been looking forward to all their special events associated with this year for a long time and that many of those were not able to happen in the traditional way. However, we would like to acknowledge this special time by creating some new memories for the Class of 2020, even if it is at a distance.

During the week June 15th, we will be hosting a series of activities and events for the graduating class. Each day, your child will log into their homeroom class to take part in that day’s activity. From a virtual yearbook signing to virtual prom, each day will be different and special in its own way. The events will end with a Virtual Graduation on June 24th, 2020. We want your child to take this time to celebrate all their accomplishments and enjoy their last few days at PS/IS 192. This will also be a great opportunity for your child to make-up any missing work and take advantage of learning any last pieces of wisdom from all their teachers. A tentative schedule of events will be sent to your child.

All items paid for through senior dues (t-shirt, cap & gown, yearbook, diploma case) will be available for pickup on June 23rd. A scheduled time of pick up will given to each family in advance. If you are not able to come at your scheduled time, please email me immediately at: jkraljev@schools.nyc.gov. Refunds for the 8th grade dance and trip will be given with your child’s package on June 23rd if payment was previously received.

Thank you for your continued support. We look forward to celebrating with you and your child during this special time.

Sincerely,

Ms. Isaac

Principal

Here is the link to download the activities schedule:

 SENIOR CELEBRATION DAYS.docx 

Dear District 20 Community,

Since the death of George Floyd on May 25, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, we’ve been moved by the response our city and our nation has had to the racism, bias, inequity, and injustice affecting our communities. Our District 20 community certainly feels this pain, sadness, anger, frustration and anxiety.

District 20 has always been a wonderful mosaic of our immigrant families standing side by side, creating the excellence that defines our District. We will continue to celebrate our great diversity and become an even stronger family and community by fostering an environment where respect for all remains a priority and core value. We will continue to seek ways to support the social-emotional and physical health and wellness of everyone in our community while continuing to make a positive difference. We will continue to emphasize -and model - values of respect, integrity, tolerance, and understanding.

As a District community, let’s continue to work together to foster respect for all within our schools and within our diverse neighborhoods. It is a time filled with so much anxiety, fear, and uncertainty so it behooves all of us to celebrate and honor what makes each of us unique. We are also interconnected and need to rely on one another, to stay focused on our efforts to ensure a safe and secure environment for all students and families.

If you are looking for more resources on antiracism and social justice, please review the collections Chancellor Carranza shared last week. They are living libraries which will continue to expand:

 For Parents and Families: https://www.schools.nyc.gov/about-us/vision-andmission/together-for-justice

 For Employees: https://infohub.nyced.org/in-our-schools/programs/striving-forjustice

Sincerely,

Karina Costantino

Superintendent

District 20

Letter to Families from the Chancellor- June 3, 2020


Dear Families,

It is hard to recall another time as gut-wrenching and heartbreaking as these recent days have been. George Floyd’s murder at the hands of police officers last week was horrifying. I am sickened. But, like many of you, I am not surprised. We have seen this abominable disregard for Black lives so many times before, including multiple times in recent weeks. It is truly agonizing to witness; it is nothing short of another pandemic presenting itself on the streets of America.


The New York City Department of Education condemns police brutality and this brutal loss of life. My heart breaks to know that yet another Black family has lost a son, a father, a brother. I stand in solidarity with Black New Yorkers and Americans, and with everyone who is mourning yet another senseless loss. Pain ripples and resonates across communities all over the City. I am with all of you as we individually and collectively reckon with this tragic injustice. The demonstrations happening in the five boroughs and in nearly 140 cities across the country are a reflection of this anguish, and the desire for a better world.

It is incredibly difficult to be a parent or caregiver right now: grappling with emotions, seeking actions that both feel of service and of the magnitude needed in this moment, and thinking through ways to begin or deepen conversations with children and families about recent horrific incidents and the systemic racism from which they spring—all at the same time. The pain and struggle are very real.

For communities of color, nothing about this pain is new. It’s been in the bodies, minds, and hearts of millions of New Yorkers and Americans for generations—because racist violence has been perpetrated for that long.

Racism also causes new harm in other ways, every day, because it is systemic—woven deeply into the fabric of our institutions, our economy, and the systems that make up our shared community. That is true in New York City, as progressive and forward-thinking as we are, including in our public school system.

At the DOE we have said, and we will continue to say: no more.

We must answer the call to be actively anti-racist and work every day to undo these systems of injustice. We will continue in our resolve to advance equity now. We will honor the dignity and humanity of every student, parent, educator, employee and member of our community every day.

No matter the form teaching and learning takes—in brick-and-mortar classrooms or on a digital device—the goal remains the same: providing an excellent education to every single student. In doing so, we must also continually find ways to dismantle institutional racism and reverse its effects.

That work is underway. It includes implementing restorative practices, training all educators and employees on implicit bias, providing mental health supports to school communities, and more. This work creates a lifelong effect in children and has the potential to transform our society in ways that make that the world safer, more just, and better for everyone.

When, for example, children learn from books featuring protagonists and lessons featuring stories from people of different races, abilities, genders, ethnicities, languages, and more, they learn also to value difference and diversity. When students experiencing anger or resentment are taught healthy ways to communicate, it’s more likely they won’t react out of unfounded fear.

We will not relent in the work to intensify equity until, student by student and school by school, change comes. We all need this, because racism doesn’t just harm Black, Brown, or Asian families—it harms us all.

June 3, 2020

Everyone has a role to play. In addition to continuing our work centrally, we are supporting educators with resources to teach episodes from our history and our present, episodes where these same shudders of injustice and outrage, peaceful protest, and also violence and destruction have ripped through our city and society.

At the same time, many of you have already been doing this work at home or are otherwise putting personal resources into these efforts—your time, your energy, your heart, or your voice. We see you, and we are grateful for your powerful commitment. Children see and feel the world around them, and now is an important time to guide them in understanding and engaging with their experiences and those of their friends, families, and fellow New Yorkers.

Below you will find resources to help start, continue, or deepen conversations with children about racism and injustice. We are also sharing resources to help with stress, exhaustion, and self-care. As parents and caregivers, caring for yourself is essential in order to be able to care for others. We will continue to update resources as we move ahead, and you can find them at schools.nyc.gov/togetherforjustice

I have been reminded of this quote by the writer James Baldwin that resonates so powerfully in this moment: “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.” These are difficult days of reckoning, but we have the opportunity—and a calling—to go farther in facing injustice.

You are our most important partners in the education of the children of New York City and the building of a better world. We are grateful for you today and every day.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza
Chancellor
New York City Department of Education

Resources to talk to your children about race and current events:

  •  Guidance for Family Conversations about George Floyd, Racism, and Law Enforcement (Anti- Defamation League)

  • Talking to Kids About Racism, Early and Often (New York Times)

  •  31 Children’s books to support conversations on race, racism and resistance (Embracerace)

  •   Black Lives Matter Still Matters (Teaching Tolerance)

  •   Talking about Race for Parents & Caregivers (National Museum of African American History &

    Culture)

  •   Coming Together, Standing Up to Racism (Sesame Street)

    Mental Health Resources to address stress and trauma:

     

    Free Mental Health Support:

    NYC Well For Staff, students and parents

Summer Reading

Dear Families,

Summer reading is so important to keep learning going and to let imaginations run free! We are thrilled to make more e-books and audiobooks for all ages available for free this summer to all DOE families, and it’s easier than ever to access them. Please read on for more information, and visit schools.nyc.gov/summerreading for additional details to be posted on Monday, June 29.

Reading with Sora!

The e-book reader Sora has a diverse set of hundreds of resources available for grades 3K-12 in a multiple languages to help students see themselves and fellow students in the books they are reading. You can download an app to your device or access them via a web browser. All you have to do is log in with your student’s DOE ID; no additional sign up is necessary. Please visit discoversora.com/nyc to get started.

Need help finding your student’s DOE login? Click here. If you received an iPad from DOE, it will have the Sora app automatically installed by July 1!

You may also visit galepages.com/nycdoe11 to access additional e-book titles and databases provided by the New York City School Library System. To access e-books from any location and databases from outside of New York State, please email libraries@schools.nyc.gov for the username and password.

Please note that while some of these resources might only be available in English, we will continue to strive to make more resources available in home languages.

Take Advantage of Public Library Resources, Too!

New York City public library systems are also providing digital resources and free access to the tutoring platform Brainfuse through internet-enabled devices, including all DOE-issued iPads.

Brooklyn Public Library. To obtain a Brooklyn Public Library eCard, fill out the form at Bklynlibrary.org.

• The New York Public Library serving the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island. To obtain a New York Public Library digital card through the free SimplyE app, please visit NYPL.org

. • Queens Public Library. To obtain a Queens Public Library eCard, fill out the form at QueensLibrary.org.

Wishing you a summer full of reading!

 

LIBRARY HELP

Optional Tutoring Resource Available through Public Libraries

The Brooklyn Public Library, is providing free access to Brainfuse,

which is an online tutoring platform for families and students. This resource is available seven days a week, from 2:00–11:00 p.m., and provides support to all grade levels in the following areas:

  • Homework Help: Interact with live tutors in math, science, reading/ writing, social studies, PSAT/SAT, ACT, AP and state standardized tests.
  • Skills-Building: Choose your topic to receive real-time help.
  • Personalized eLearning Tools: My File Sharing, My Session Replay,

My Tutoring Archive, My Tests Archive, and more.

  • 24-Hour Writing Lab: Submit essays and other kinds of writing for constructive feedback.
  • Homework Questions: Submit homework questions for expert guidance.
  • Foreign Language Lab/Spanish-Speaking Support.
    To access Brainfuse, New York State residents must sign up for a free library

card in one of the three library systems. See below for information

• Brooklyn Public Library: To obtain a Brooklyn Public Library eCard, fill out this form. Families and students may access Brainfuse using their Brooklyn Public Library eCard

 

UPDATE FOR FAMILIES MAY 30. 2020

May 30, 2020

Dear Families,

Thank you for your continued patience and flexibility in response to this ever-evolving crisis. We are writing today to share some important updates and reminders about the end of year school calendar.

We have two days coming up in June that were originally scheduled as times when students would not be in attendance. However, with the ongoing pandemic, students will be expected to participate in remote learning on both of these days:

 Thursday, June 4 was originally scheduled as a non-attendance day for all students in observance of Brooklyn / Queens Day (also known as Anniversary Day).

 Tuesday, June 9 was originally scheduled as a non-attendance day for students in schools serving grades K-8, as well as District 75 schools and programs.

On June 4, all students are expected to complete work independently as staff will be engaged in professional development. Teachers are not expected to engage students on June 4; instead, schools will set students up in advance with independent work for the day.

On June 9, students who attend a school serving grades K-8, or who attend any District 75 school, are expected to complete work independently as staff will be engaged in reorganization work. Teachers in these schools are not expected to engage students on June 9; instead, schools will set students up in advance with independent work for the day.

If you have questions or concerns regarding the school schedule for your student, please contact your school for additional information.

As a reminder, June 26 is the last day of school and a half day for all students. We will issue additional guidance to families about the end of the 2019-20 school year in the coming weeks.

Thank you again for your partnership as we continually navigate unfamiliar terrain. I often say that we have the best students, staff, and families in the world. You and your children continue to prove that, every day. Together, we will continue to weather this storm.

Sincerely, Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

 

 

May 11, 2020 - PMIS (renamed MIS-C) Information

May 11, 2020

Dear Families,

Health and safety is our top priority, and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC Health Department) and the Department of Education (DOE) continue to work together to keep the city’s students, families, and staff members safe, healthy, and informed as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic evolves. 

The NYC Department of Health is currently investigating cases of Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome, or PMIS, a new health condition appearing in children in New York City and elsewhere. The NYC Health Department is also investigating the possible association between PMIS and COVID-19 in children. Some doctors think the condition is related to having COVID19, but the connection is still not clear.

PMIS is a rare condition that is not contagious. However, because it is life-threatening, it is important to know the signs. Most children have a persistent, high fever lasting several days, along with other symptoms, including:

  • Irritability or sluggishness
  • Abdominal pain without another explanation
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Rash
  • Conjunctivitis, or red or pink eyes
  • Enlarged lymph node (“gland”) on one side of the neck
  • Red, cracked lips or red tongue that looks like a strawberry
  • Swollen hands and feet, which might also be red

You should call your doctor if your child becomes ill and has had continued fever. Your doctor will ask about your child’s symptoms and use that information to recommend next steps. If your child is severely ill, you should go to the nearest emergency room or call 911 immediately.

Although it is not yet known whether it is associated with COVID-19, it is important parents and children take precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. 

Parents should help their children understand the importance of the following measures and ensure their children follow them:

  • As per NYS Executive Order No. 202.17, all people over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others.
  • Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering.
  • When outside the home, adults and children must maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible.
  • Parents should remind children of the importance of good hand hygiene and should help ensure that children frequently wash their hands.

The health and safety of our communities remain our top priority, and we will continue to follow all guidance and take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Please contact 311 with any questions. 

Sincerely,                                   

Richard A. Carranza                                                 Oxiris Barbot, MD

Chancellor                                                                  Commissioner

Department of Education                                     Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

 

The NYC Health Department may change recommendations as the situation evolves. 5.10.2020

June 5, 2020 - MIS-C (formerly PMIS) Update

June 5, 2020

Dear Families,

The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority, and we will continue to take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Recently, we shared some information with you regarding Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). Although we do not have any new updates to report, guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will also find the MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week and translated into multiple languages here.

As a reminder for the health of all children in New York City, all children over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others. Free face coverings are available at DOE Meal Hubs in all five boroughs—you can find one close to you on the DOE website. Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering. When outside the home, adults and children should maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible.


We will continue to communicate with you on a weekly basis regarding MIS-C and provide updates, if any. Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and please contact 311 with any questions.

 

Sincerely,

page1image1731936

Richard A. Carranza
Chancellor
New York City Department of Education

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 18, 2020

Dear Families, 

Following up on our letter to you last week about the new health condition appearing in children in New York City and elsewhere, linked is a Fact Sheet from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC Health) that provides additional information.  

Per NYC Health, this condition has been renamed Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)— formerly Pediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (PMIS). The condition is rare and it is potentially lifethreatening, so it is important that you know its signs and symptoms. 

NYC Health’s Fact Sheet conveys new information about the syndrome, its symptoms, when to seek medical help, treatments, and preventative steps. Because MIS-C is associated with COVID-19, acting to keep your child from being exposed to COVID-19 continues to be essential.  

As a reminder, families should help their children understand the importance of the following measures and ensure their children follow them: 

  • As per NYS Executive Order 202.17, all people over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others. Free face coverings are available at DOE Meal Hubs in all five boroughs—you can find one close to you on the DOE website.
  • Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering.
  • When outside the home, adults and children must maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible.
  • Parents should remind children of the importance of good hand hygiene and should help ensure that children frequently wash their hands.

The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority, and we will continue to take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and do not hesitate to contact 311 with any questions. 

Sincerely,                                                        

Richard A. Carranza                                                                

Chancellor                                                                                

New York City Department of Education                               

Fact Sheet: Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)

Fact Sheet: Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) 

What is multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children?

Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a new health condition associated with COVID-19 that is appearing in children in New York City (NYC) and elsewhere. The syndrome was previously called pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome or PMIS. 

MIS-C is like other serious inflammatory conditions such as Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome. Children with MIS-C can have problems with their heart and other organs and need to receive medical care in a hospital. 

MIS-C is a rare condition. However, because children with this syndrome may become seriously ill, it is important that parents know the signs and symptoms their children may have, so they can get help right away.  

What are the signs and symptoms of MIS-C?

Most children have fever (temperature of 100.4 degrees F or 38.0 degrees C or greater) lasting several days, along with other symptoms. 

Other common symptoms include: 

 

•      Irritability or decreased activity

•      Abdominal pain without another explanation

•      Diarrhea

•      Vomiting

•      Rash

•      Conjunctivitis (red or pink eyes)

•      Poor feeding

•      Red, cracked lips or red, bumpy tongue that looks like a strawberry

•      Swollen hands and feet, which might also be red

 

When should I call my child’s doctor or get emergency care?

Call your child’s doctor immediately if your child has a persistent fever plus any of the above symptoms. The doctor will ask about the symptoms your child has and use that information to recommend next steps. If your child is severely ill, go to the nearest emergency room or call 911 immediately. 

Is MIS-C contagious?

MIS-C is not contagious, but it is possible that your child has COVID-19 or another infection that may be contagious. This is why hospitals will take infection control measures when treating your child. 

Is there a treatment for MIS-C?

Currently, children with MIS-C are being treated with different therapies, including medications targeted at the body’s immune system and inflammatory response. Children may receive other medications to protect their heart, kidneys and other organs. 

How can I prevent my child from getting MIS-C?

You should take steps to prevent your child from being exposed to COVID-19. Face coverings, hand hygiene and physical distancing are the best ways to prevent COVID-19. Children with underlying medical conditions can be at higher risk for poor outcomes of COVID-19, making prevention measures even more important.

The NYC Health Department may change recommendations as the situation evolves.                                   5.18.20

MIS-C UPDATE MAY 29, 2020

 

May 29, 2020

Dear Families,   

The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority, and we will continue to take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Two weeks ago, we shared some information with you regarding the Pediatric Multi-System Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (PMIS), a rare condition that is potentially life-threatening in children. Last week, we learned from DOHMH that the condition was renamed Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). Guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will also find the MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week and newly translated into multiple languages here.

As a gentle reminder, families should continue to discuss with their children the importance of the following measures and ensure your children are doing the following:

  ● Consistent with Executive Order 202.17: all people over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others. Free face coverings are available at DOE Meal Hubs in all five boroughs—you can find one close to you on the DOE website. 

● Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering. 

● When outside the home, adults and children must maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible. 

● Parents should remind children of the importance of good hand hygiene and should help ensure that children frequently wash their hands.   

We will continue to communicate with you on a weekly basis regarding MIS-C. Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and do not hesitate to contact 311 with any questions.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

Elevate's Technology Webinar

Live Webinar for Families:

Elevate’s free Parent Webinar this afternoon at 4pm & 5pm

on Video Game Addiction

 

WEBINAR

[LANGUAGE]

DATE & TIME

REGISTRATION LINK

English-speaking webinar

Wednesday,

June 24th @ 4pm

Registration Page

Spanish-speaking webinar

Wednesday,

June 24th @ 5pm

Regístrate Aquí

 

Dial-A-Teacher

The UFT has re-opened its Dial-A-Teacher program, a homework help line for students, run by classroom teachers. This resource is available from 4:00–7:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, for students in grades K–5. Due to limitations caused by school building closures, the help line is currently only available for ELA and math homework from teachers speaking English. The UFT is hoping to expand to other subjects, grades, and languages soon.

 

CENSUS 2020

The 2020 Census

  • It's quick and easy. The 2020 Census questionnaire will take about 10 minutes to complete.
  • It's safe, secure, and confidential. Your information and privacy are protected by law.
  • Your response helps to direct billions of dollars in federal funds to local communities for schools, roads, and other public services.
  • Results from the 2020 Census will be used to determine the number of seats each state has in Congress and your political representation at all levels of government.

El Censo del 2020

  • Es rápido y fácil. Completar el cuestionario del Censo del 2020 toma unos 10 minutos.
  • Es seguro, protegido y confidencial. Su información y su privacidad están protegidas por ley.
  • Sus respuestas ayudan a destinar miles de millones de dólares de fondos federales a las comunidades locales para escuelas, carreteras y otros servicios públicos.
  • Los resultados del Censo del 2020 se usarán para determinar el número de escaños que tiene cada estado en el Congreso, así como su representación política a todos los niveles del gobierno.

PLEASE FILL OUT YOUR CENSUS TODAY!

POR FAVOR LLENE SU CENSO HOY!

 

Complete the census online at my2020census.gov.

Or call 844-330-2020 

 

Parent Support Hotlines

 National and local NYC hotlines for resources, emotional support, and guidance for parents in crisis and in need of a knowledgeable and helpful listening ear.

  • NY Foundling
    • 888-435-7553
    • Support by providing resources over the phone. The crisis nursery is closed.
  • Parents Helping Parents Stress Line
    • 1-800-632-8188
    • Support for parents feeling overwhelmed, stressed, etc.
  • Child Help National Child Abuse Hotline
    • 1-800-4-A-CHILD/1-800-422-4453
    • Parents can call to talk to a counselor about the stress they are under or young people can call to ask for help for themselves and talk to a counselor
  • Su Familia: The National Hispanic Family Health Helpline
  • National Parent Helpline
    • 1-855- 4A PARENT / 1-855-427-2736
    • Emotional support, resources, advice and more from a peer advocate
  • NYC Well
    • 1-888-NYC-WELL (1-888-692-9355), Text WELL to 65173
    • Chat at https://nycwell.cityofnewyork.us/en/
    • Free, confidential, 24/7 mental health support by speaking to a local counselor via phone, text, or chat in more than 200 languages.
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline
    • 1−800−799−7233
    • Support for people with experiences of domestic violence. Resources for those quarantined with their abuser.
    • https://www.thehotline.org/
  • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

May 20, 2020 - SUMMER SCHOOL UPDATE

 

May 20, 2020

Dear Families,

Earlier this week, we announced our plans for summer learning, to ensure that our students can continue to engage and receive the academic supports they need to be ready for returning to school in the fall. We are writing to you today with an update on the summer calendar, informed by feedback from DOE communities.

For elementary and middle school students who are required or recommended to attend summer school, the program will start one week earlier and will run from Monday, July 6 – Tuesday, August 11. There is no change to the duration or structure of the program.

For high school students who are attending summer school, courses will also start one week earlier and will run from Monday, July 6 – Friday, August 14. There is no change to the duration or structure of this program either

. For students with 12-month Individualized Education Plan (IEPs) services, there will be no change to the calendar. Our teachers start on Wednesday, July 1 and students are expected to participate from Thursday, July 2– Thursday, August 13.

These changes will help accelerate learning for all students. Beginning summer school earlier—closer to the end of the regular school year—allows for continuous learning for students. Concluding programs earlier also allows more time for continuous rest for your family in the month of August.

We appreciate your ongoing patience and flexibility as we adapt to this crisis in real time. Nothing is more important than the health, safety, and continued academic success of your child: we thank you for your partnership in this important endeavor now more than ever.

Sincerely, Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor New York City Department of Education

May 19, 2020 - Summer School Information

May 19, 2020

Dear Families,

We know that the COVID-19 crisis and the unexpected shift to remote learning in the second half of the school year have presented challenges for many families all across the City. The strength, perseverance, and dedication of our 1.1 million students and the staff and families who support them day after day continues to amaze me. We have continually evolved our policies to meet this unprecedented time, developing and in some cases entirely reinventing them to support our students and families. Today we are writing to share an update on summer school.

In continued adherence to federal, State, and City health guidelines, we are adapting our summer school model for summer 2020. This year, we will offer summer school via remote instruction, allowing us to provide more students than ever before with the academic supports they need and a bridge from this school year to the next. In addition to academic instruction, students participating in these summer school programs will also have opportunities to go on self-paced virtual field trips and engage in daily social-emotional learning activities.

Who in grades 3-8 will attend summer school?

Students in grades 3–8 who are not promoted in June will be required to attend summer school. They will participate in six weeks of remote instruction from Monday, July 13 – Tuesday, August 18.

Some students in grades 3–8 who are promoted in June may also be recommended by their teacher for additional academic support over the summer. They will participate in six weeks of remote instruction from Monday, July 13 – Tuesday, August 18.

Your school will notify you in June if your child is required or recommended to participate in summer learning programs.

Who in grades 9-12 will attend summer school?

Students in grades 9–12 who receive a grade of Course in Progress, or who need to retake a course they have failed in a prior term, will participate in remote instruction for the course(s) in which they need to earn credit. Remote instruction will run from Monday, July 13 –Friday, August 21.

Your school will notify you in June if your child is required or recommended to participate in summer learning programs.

What about students with 12-month Individualized Education Program (IEP) services?

Students in all grades with 12-month IEPs will participate in remote summer programming from Wednesday, July 1– Thursday, August 13. All students who are receiving or are eligible to receive these services will be contacted by their school shortly.

Your child’s academic success is of utmost importance. To ensure that students across the city receive the support they need this summer, we are dedicating all of our efforts to providing mandatory and recommended summer learning programs, and we will not be operating elective Summer Academy and school-based enrichment programs this year. We will continue to share resources and summer-specific activities at schools.nyc.gov/summer in the coming weeks so that all students can find new and exciting ways to continue their learning this summer.

We always say that New York City has the best students, staff, and families in the world, and nothing will ever change that. You continue to prove this day after day. Thank you.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

Report Cards

If you need assistance with finding your child's report card, on NYC Schools Account

 please call Ms. Fioriello, our Parent Coordinator at  929-314-4110 or email her at:

Yfioriello@schools.nyc.gov 

 

 

Grading Policy for Remote Learning

May 15, 2020
 
Grading Policy Update found on the Infohub
 
 
April 28, 2020

Chancellor Carranza and Chief Academic Officer Linda Chen Announce the Grading Policy for Remote Learning

Dear Families,

This unprecedented time of COVID-19 has presented difficulty and struggles for all New Yorkers, and we recognize that supporting your children in their continued learning in the midst of this crisis has been no small feat. We are amazed by the resilience and resolve that all of you—the families of our 1.1 million students—have shown as we transformed our entire system to remote learning. We are grateful for all that you are doing to support the success of your child as we finish the 2019-2020 school year in remote learning. 

This transition would be a challenge at any time, but in the midst of the anxiety and trauma so many of our communities are experiencing due to the pandemic, it could have been insurmountable. Still, you have done it, being there for your children in every way you can to support their learning despite not necessarily knowing where the next meal will be coming from, or dealing with illness or loss in your family or community, or any other number of insecurities this time has brought. 

That is why we have continually evolved our policies to meet this moment, developing and in some cases entirely reinventing them to support all of you—our students and families. These policies run the gamut from attendance to class scheduling to technology usage and beyond. Today, we are writing with another important policy update, concerning student grading 

Grades are important for understanding a student’s progress toward meeting learning standards, but they are just one way our educators are measuring and discerning how a student is engaging with schoolwork and making progress. We must ensure that support for our students includes not just academics, but social-emotional learning, health and safety, and physical and mental wellness, and there are relationships in place that affirm and empower our students and families. We are giving our educators the tools and skills they need to understand and support our students socially and emotionally. We will continue to create resources for students and families that elevate these supports within the context of COVID-19. Implementation of the policy by school leaders will be considerate of students who have experienced emotional loss, death, mental health issues, or didn’t have access to a device or connectivity right away. We know that just as you are our partners in learning, we are yours in the emotional support your children may need during this time. 

We have heard from students, parents, teachers, school leaders, and many others across the City to inform our revised grading policy. We see you, we hear you, and we believe that the final policy we are issuing emphasizes flexibility and patience for students in these unprecedented times, while also keeping students engaged without penalty for the trauma they may be experiencing. It maintains clear expectations that acknowledge each individual student’s experience, and creates a consistent, equitable system across all schools. The policy seeks to minimize stress on families and students, while still providing next year’s teachers with the information they need about an individual student’s progress toward achieving standards.

 

What You Need to Know

The grading policy outlined below is in effect for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year only. Teachers will base students’ final grades on a holistic review of their progress before and after we started remote learning. Attendance will not be a factor in students’ grades. No student will receive a failing final grade.

Grade(s) 

Grading Policy Summary 

3K & Pre-K 

No change because students do not receive report cards or grades. 

K - 5th 

Students receive final grades of either “Meets Standards” (MT) or “Needs Improvement” (N). 

6th-8th 

Students receive final grades of “Meets Standards” (MT), “Needs Improvement” (N), or “Course in Progress” (NX). 

9th – 12th 

Your school’s existing grading scale applies, but no failing grade will be issued. A “Course in Progress” (NX) will be issued instead. After final grades have been issued, students and families have the option to convert any or all passing Spring Semester 2020 final grades to pass (CR will be the symbol used in this case). Any CR grade will not be factored into a students’ GPA.

The DOE is continuing to develop plans for programming and supports over the summer months. More information about summer school will be made available by your school and shared in the upcoming weeks. 

If You Have Questions

For elementary and middle schools, principals will generally serve as primary points to answer questions regarding the grading policy for families. 

For high schools, school counselors and college counselors will generally serve as primary points to answer questions regarding the grading policy for students and families, along with principals. If you need help identifying the school counselor or college counselor, please contact your principal

Please also see our Frequently Asked Questions document for additional information. We are committed not only to supporting students in their continued learning through June and beyond, but to supporting you as our primary partner in your child’s education. We know you have had a lot of questions and faced a lot of challenges in this transition; you have had to take on essential, invaluable new roles to keep your child’s education going and become indispensable partners to teachers. There are many resources available on this website, and your student’s school is also standing by to support you. 

We always say that New York City has the best students, staff, and families in the world, and nothing will ever change that. You continue to prove this true each and every day. Thank you.

 

April 11, 2020

Dear Families:

THE CITY OF NEW YORK

Less than one month ago, we came together and began transforming the largest school system in the nation. The battle against COVID-19 left us no choice but to close school buildings to students and staff, transition to remote teaching and learning from home, and adjust to distancing from each other to remain safe.

Now, we face another painful decision. After consulting with public health experts about the ongoing trajectory of the virus, and with educators about the potential for continued disruption for the remainder of the year, we have decided that New York City school buildings will not reopen during the 2019-2020 school year. Teachers and students will finish the school year in remote learning. We will continue to operate our 400+ school-based Meal Hubs, which serve three free meals a day to any New Yorker who needs them, and we will continue to ensure child care for the children of essential workers.

This is a painful but necessary decision for two reasons. First, public health experts have determined that community transmission of COVID-19 will be widespread well into the end of the school year. Even at low-level transmission, we’d have new cases, which would be extremely difficult to contain school-to- school. We believe there simply wouldn’t be enough time to bring our students back.

Second, we, as parents, know how important it is to have some sense of predictability in order to effectively plan for your family. This crisis is hitting all of us very hard. But we are hopeful that this sense of certainty will allow for more stability and the ability to better plan for our work and home lives.

We know this will have an immense impact on the 1.1 million students and 150,000 staff who make up our New York City public schools. But we are inspired by the extraordinary ways everyone in our school communities has risen to this challenge. Every day, we see how you – students, families, and the dedicated staff serving and supporting our public schools – are going above and beyond to connect in the face of this crisis, all in service of making sure learning continues. We also know that you’ll need support to continue this tremendous undertaking. That’s why we’re making the following commitments to you as we extend the closure of our school buildings until the end of the school year:

  1. Every student who has requested an internet-enabled device will have one by the end of April. No student will go without the tools they need for learning. We have already delivered tens of thousands of devices to our most vulnerable students, including those in shelter and temporary housing. We are committed to closing the remainder of the digital divide for each of our kids. If you still need a device, please fill out the 

    Remote Learning Device Request Form at schools.nyc.gov, or call 311.

  2. We will make sure that parents can ask and get answers to their questions about remote learning. We know you need someone to turn to who will answer any question you have about education during this time—from social-emotional support to academic progress to graduation requirements. Your school is always ready and willing to support you, and we will also make sure that additional support is available as we continue in our remote environment. This means increasing hours and staffing of our parent hotlines so you can get the answers you need. Call 311 to be directed to the right DOE support.

  1. We’ll continue to invest in instructional resources, enrichment programs, and student supports for your families to engage in learning at home. Our students need and deserve rich, deep programming and remote learning opportunities as we go further into the school year, and we will continue to provide them. This includes learning resources provided by your teachers and schools, but it also includes enriching and fun materials from the world-class cultural institutions, libraries, museums, parks, and more right here in New York City.

  2. We will ensure every high school senior is supported towards graduation. We’ll provide 1:1 counseling support to every senior, working closely with schools and families to understand if students are on track—and if not, provide opportunities to help them get there. Guidance counselors from every high school will reach out to every senior to make sure they are on a path to graduate.

  3. We will reopen schools stronger than ever in September, ensuring the safety of our buildings and the resources in place to combat any learning loss and provide emotional support to our students, families, and educators as needed to resume learning and reconnect our communities.

    Nothing about this is easy. For the last six years of this administration, public schools have been the

anchor of our fight against inequality. They are how we’ve delivered increased opportunity, and we can’t overstate the loss of the concrete sense of community our schools provide. But this is about saving lives.

We are so grateful for your flexibility and patience; we know how hard every one of you has worked to support your children’s learning at home. And we will continue to make every effort to both support you and keep learning going during this unprecedented time.

We will also continue to keep you updated. As a reminder, you can visit DOE’s website anytime at schools.nyc.gov for more information and updates on our plans for the rest of the school year.

Sincerely,

Bill de Blasio, Mayor of New York City

&  Richard A. Carranza ,Chancellor New York City Department of Education

NYC Schools Account

Parents and Guardians: We’ve made it easier to  sign up for a NYC Schools Account (NYCSA).

Setting up a basic account will allow you to get emergency notifications from the DOE.  

You can create a basic account online from any computer, phone, or tablet. All you need to do is:

 

·        Go to https://mystudent.nyc/saa/signup 

·        Set up the account by:

o   Entering  your name and email address,

o   creating a password, and

o   answering a few brief security questions so you can reset the password if you forget it.

 

After you create your account, you will need to verify your identity and your relationship to that student. You can do that at the upcoming Parent-Teacher Conferences on Thursday,March 5,2020. Once you do that you will be able to see your child’s grades, test scores, and attendance. 

 

Zoom

May 6, 2020

Dear Families,

As we enter a new month, we continue to work to equip all of you, our families and our school communities, with the information, tools, and resources that you need for remote learning as we fight the COVID-19 pandemic together as a City. This has been an ongoing process, as we all blaze new trails in uncharted territory of fully remote learning. Throughout it all, the health, safety, and security of our communities has been our focus and priority.

As you may recall, security and privacy concerns for our students and staff, including unwanted and unsafe meeting interruptions, led us to prohibit the use of Zoom in early April. The decision was a difficult one, but after reviewing the risks, we know it was in the best interest of our school communities. As we indicated when we made this announcement in April, we would continue to engage Zoom and other online collaboration platforms to make sure that students, teachers, and everyone in the DOE community had safe, secure means to interact with each other that respected student privacy.

We are pleased to announce that now, following several weeks of collaboration with the company, we are now able to offer Zoom as a safe, secure platform for use across the DOE. All schools and students will have free access to a central, secure DOE account for learning and collaboration. Our work with Zoom included reaching an agreement about data encryption and storage, creating settings for our platform to make sure only DOE participants and specifically invited guests can enter classrooms or meetings and giving meeting hosts more control over their classrooms and meetings.

This means that:

  • All staff and students must use the new DOE central account to access Zoom
  • All DOE students and staff will be able to sign onto nycdoe.zoom.us with their DOE email and password, and will be able to use the full complement of features Zoom offers
  • The central DOE account has been pre-arranged to ensure safety and security of all participants, which protects all members of our communities
  • There is no cost for schools, teachers or service providers (for use of Zoom, as well as previously approved platforms like Microsoft and Google)
  • We will add Zoom to all DOE-issued iPads

Please visit the Getting Started with Zoom page (https://www.schools.nyc.gov/learn-at-home/technical-tools-andsupport/getting-started-with-zoom) to learn more about accessing Zoom, including:

  • How to access DOE Zoom
  • New security settings and instructions for use
  • Contacts for technical support for families

Our new agreement with Zoom will give your children another way to connect with their schools, teachers and school staff. We are excited to be able to have another safe and secure option for school communities to use during this unprecedented time.

As always, we are grateful for your flexibility and patience. We know how hard every one of you works to support your children’s learning at home. And we are glad that you will now have access to another tool in Zoom that will help keep learning going.

Sincerely,

Richard A. Carranza

Chancellor

New York City Department of Education

Links for Updates and Resources

For summer resources please visit:

 

For any coronavirus updates please visit: http://www.schools.nyc.gov/school-life/health-and-wellness/coronavirus-update

 

For Learning Resources by grade, please visit: schools.nyc.gov/learnathome

Your child's teacher will be in communication with you as well and will provide your child with assignments. 

For food and mental health resources:

 Food Pantries List.pdf  

Food Pantries and Soup Kitchens List.xlsx 

 COVID-19 Response Handout - Accessing Mental Health Resources.pdf 

www.catholicmigration.org- For inquiries relating to immigration, housing, labor, and/or any resources needed during the COVID-19 pandemic. Phone #718-236-3000

Grab-and-Go Meals Now at P.S. 192!

Starting March 23, NYC students can pick up 3 free meals daily from 7:30AM - 1:30PM, Monday to Friday, at 400 NYC sites. The sites closest to our school are:

 

  • P.S./ I.S. 192 4715 18th Ave. Brooklyn, NY 11204
  • The SEEALL Academy, located at 5601 16 Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11204
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt High School, located at 5800 20 Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11204
  • P.S. 48, located at 6015 18 Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11204
  • P.S. 164, located at 4211 14 Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11219
  • P.S. 179 Kensington, located at 202 Avenue C Brooklyn, NY 11218
  • P.S. 217, located at 1100 Newkirk Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11230
  • J.H.S. 062 Ditmas, located at 700 Cortelyou Road Brooklyn, NY 11218
  • P.S. 099, located at 1120 East 10 Street Brooklyn, NY 11230
  • J.H.S. 227 Edward B. Shallow, located at 6500 16 Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11204
  • P.S. 131 Brooklyn, located at 4305 Ft Hamilton Parkway Brooklyn, NY 11219

To learn the location of the nearest meal hub, you can text FOOD or COMIDA to 877-877. You can also visit the website: https://www.opt-osfns.org/schoolfoodny/meals/default.aspx

Free Wi-fi options For all students

Spectrum

Qualifying households with students can get 60 days of FREE access with a Spectrum Internet account.

  • Available for households with K-12 or college students
  • Limited to new accounts who do not already have a Spectrum Internet subscription

Call 1-844-579-3743 to enroll.

Comcast will be offering free service at its Xfinity hotspots for 60 days which is normally available to all qualified low-income households for $9.95/month. We’ll send all new customers a free self-install kit that includes a cable modem with a Wi-Fi router. There will be no term contract or credit check and no shipping fee. To sign up, applicants can simply visit www.internetessentials.com. The accessible website also includes the option to video chat with customer service agents in American Sign Language.

There are also two dedicated phone numbers 1-855-846-8376 for English and 1-855-765-6995 for Spanish.

 AT&T is waiving bills for 60 days, AT&T Hot Spots are now freeAltice USA recognizes the important role we play in providing our Optimum and Suddenlink customers with connectivity solutions, and we are committed to helping schools and students stay connected during this unprecedented time. For households with K-12 and/or college students who may be displaced due to school closures and who do not currently have home internet access, we are offering our Altice Advantage Internet solution for free for 60 days to any new customer household within our footprint. After your first two free months expire, you can either cancel the service (which you can do at any time) or keep it as a regular paying Altice Advantage Internet customer.

If you live in the Optimum service area, please call 866.200.9522
If you live in the Suddenlink service area, please call 888.633.0030

 

 

 

For updates on COVID-19 text 692-692 and message COVID-19. Para recibir informacion en español envie un texto al 692-692 y escriba COVIDESP

Need help? Our Parent Coordinator is here for you.

If you require assistance with any school matters, please contact our Parent Coordinator, Yolanda Fioriello, at (929)-314-4110. She will be able to further assist you.

Some things you may need help with can include:

  • Obtaining technology from the Department of Education
  • Logging into your child's Google Classroom

 

As the corona virus continues to spread, many people are finding themselves in quarantine in order to most effectively practice “social distancing.” I wanted to share this wonderful activity to do with your families.

Around the world, children are leaving rainbow art on their windows as a message of hope.  Some of these colorful displays include encouraging words like “Stay Strong” or It will be okay”.  You can create your own rainbow masterpiece by using any kind of art materials such as: markers, crayons, colored pencils, construction paper, computer paper, etc. Let your kids show off their creativity!  When you are done, hang it in your windows to show inspiration and hope. 

 

Según el virus corona sigue afectando a mas y mas gente, muchos se encuentran en cuarentena, para mejor practicar ‘distancia social.’ Queremos compartir con ustedes una actividad maravillosa que pueden hacer con sus familias.

Alrededor del mundo, niños están poniendo arco iris que han hecho en sus ventanas en un mensaje de esperanza. Algunos de estos arcos iris incluyen palabras tales como “mantente fuerte’ o “vamos a estar bien”. Pueden crear su obra de arte usando materiales tales como: marcadores, crayolas, lápices de colorear, papel de construcción, papel de computadoras, etc. Deje que sus niños sean creativos. Cuando terminen, póngalo en la ventana para demostrar inspiración y esperanza.

 

Statement on Accessiblity

Statement on Accessibility: We are working to make this website easier to access for people with disabilities, and will follow the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. If you need assistance with a 8 particular page or document on our current site, please contact the Parent Coordinator, Yolanda Fioriello to request assistance.

Citywide Behavioral Expectations To Support Student Learning -Grades K-5

Citywide Behavioral Expectations To Support Student Learning Grades 6-12

EnVision

We would like to inform you of a wonderful tool you can use with your child’s en Vision math homework, and it is FREE!  Currently available in Spanish and English.

 On your phone or iPad  go to the App Store . or Google play   Type in bounce pages by Pearson . Download.

 Once the app is downloaded you can scan your child’s homework page and a short video will play with an overview of the lesson the homework is assigned from.

 Any questions please contact your child’s Teacher.

 

Imagine Learning

                             app.imaginelearning.com/?sitecode=NYC

Prevent Flu

Seasonal Influenza (Flu)

Influenza (or flu) is a seasonal respiratory (lung) infection that causes fever and a cough or sore throat. It is most common during the fall and winter months. Vaccination is the BEST way to protect against the flu.

Seasonal Flu Vaccine

Get your flu vaccine today! Many health care providers and pharmacies now have flu vaccine.

Prevent Influenza

Health Bulletin: Influenza/Flu (PDF)
Other languages (PDF): [الإنفلونزا] [ইনফ্লুয়েঞ্জা/ ফ্লু] [流行性感冒 / 流感 (繁體中文)] [流行性感冒 / 流感 (简体中文)] [Influenza / Rim] [La grippe] [Influenza] [인플루엔자 / 독감] [Grypa] [Грипп] [Influenza / gripe] [انفلوئنزا / فلو] [אינפלוענזא \ פלו]

Spelling Bee Winner!

  Mehrubon Ulmasova from class 8-510 was successful during The District Spelling Bee and has moved on to The City Wide Spelling Which will be in February. Congratulations to her on her success and achievement!

Twitter

  

Achieve NYC

ACHIEVE NYC answers all your questions on DOE policy and procedures.

Updated for 2018/2019 school year and available in 10 languages. 

https://infohub.nyced.org/resources/translated-documents/achievenyc

School Websites